Absolute Zambia Safaris

Northern Zambia - Bangweulu Swamps
When one looks out over Lake Bangweulu, the grey blue waters disappear into the horizon, blending in completely with the colour of the sky. It is difficult to tell just where the horizon is. ‘Bangweulu’ means ‘The Place Where the Water Meets the Sky.’

The Lake is exploited more as a fish source than for its tourist potential. This is unfortunate, as it’s beauty is breathtaking. There are rumours of developing a tourist resort and having a luxury cruise boat for hire. But for the moment this is a an interesting stopover for the intrepid vehicle traveller or backpacker.

The main catches in the Lake are Cychlids (bream, tigerfish, yellow belly) and catfish. About 57 000 metric tons of fish are harvested from the Lake each year. Although fish stocks are not in


Absolute Zambia Safaris is one of the renowned travel companies that are engaged in offering high quality tour packages for the convenience of the travelers in Zambia. Our packages are available for diverse locations in South Luangwa in Zambia. These packages are inclusive of personalized itineraries and amazing facilities. So, explore the beautiful scenic locations while enjoying the rare species that are found in the National parks of South Luangwa. Have a safari amid the jungles of Zambia to fully experience the wilderness of the country. You’ll notice the diversity of wildlife when you view the animals, birds, and other species closely. So, contact us to book South Luangwa National Park tour in Zambia.

Clients can dial the given numbers for any query related to South Luangwa National Park tour in Zambia.


North Luangwa National Park
Mwaleshi Camp, located in the vast wilderness of North Luangwa National Park, is a 45 minute flight from Mfuwe Airport. Hidden within a scenic bend of the Mwaleshi River 10km upstream of the confluence with the Luangwa River, the camp is a truly special and remarkable place, unlike any other.

There are few roads in this remote area and the majority of activities are done on foot, following existing animal trails. All senses become attuned to the surrounding bush as guests experience the variations in the magical diversity of the area.

Walkers enjoy the freedom of Africa’s limitlessness on foot, accompanied by an experienced manager/guide and an armed National Park scout. Thanks to the availability of a vehicle – which drops off and collects guests – attractions


Lower Zambezi National Park
Situated on the banks of the Zambezi River in the south-eastern part of Zambia, opposite Zimbabwe's Mana Pools National Park, the Lower Zambezi National Park occupies 4092 sq. kms, with 120 kms of river frontage. Its distinguishing features are the rugged escarpment to the north, the river itself, and its numerous islands, lagoons and floodplains which attract most of the Zambian wildlife. There are approximately 50 mammal species and 400 bird species, which thrive in the Park, as well as a wide variety of spectacular trees, grasses and flowers.

This area is still unspoiled as it is new to tourism and is afforded a high level of protection from the Zambian Government and the local tour operators. It was only declared a National Park in 1983, and the Cumings Family, who own and


Kafue National Park
Found in the centre of western Zambia, Kafue National Park is the oldest and largest of Zambia’s national parks. It covers a massive 22,400 km2.

First established as a National Park in the 1950’s by the legendary Norman Carr, Kafue is one of the largest national parks in the whole of Africa. Despite its size and prominent location only two hours drive from Livingstone, it remains little-known and largely unexplored with vast tracts of its virgin bush still untouched. Thanks to its size and variety of habitat types the Kafue holds a fantastic diversity of wildlife.

In recent years the Park has seen a well-managed growth in the number of Safari Camps and Lodges that operate in and around the Park. This new interest has brought with it more visitors and investment to the area, notably in infrastructure with a number of well-graded roads and airstrips.
As a consequence of the increasing interest and benefits in terms of investment this brings, the wildlife is beginning to enjoy an increased level of protection by the Zambian Wildlife Authority (ZAWA), always aided and supported by the operators in and adjoining the park.


Living Stone
Named after the famous Victorian missionary explorer, Dr David Livingstone, who explored this area extensively, Livingstone Town was established in 1905.

As a major European settlement, being close to the Zambezi River crossing over to Southern Rhodesia, the town was made the capital of Northern Rhodesia in 1911. As the capital, it enjoyed excellent facilities far superior to anything elsewhere in the country, as can be seen from the surviving Edwardian buildings that line the city’s main road. Livingstone even had the distinction of having the country’s first newspaper. The capital was moved to Lusaka in 1935 and the bustling city has become a quiet town, but still retaining a special charm. A major event in 2011 was the installation of the town’s first set of traffic


Lying on the southern shores of Lake Tanganyika in the Northern most tip of Zambia, Nsumbu National Park covers an area of just over 2000 square kilometers. It includes 100kms of some of the most pristine shores of this vast Lake. Its beauty ranges from sandy beaches, vertical cliffs, rocky coves and natural bays to the rugged hills and deep valleys of the interior. The Lufubu River winds its way through the Park and pours into Lake Tanganyika.

The western boundary of Nsumbu National Park, or Sumbu as it is called locally, is buffered by Tondwa Game Management Area, an IUCN Category VIII Multiple Use Management Area of 54,000 ha. The much larger Kaputa Game Management Area (360,000 ha) is also contiguous with the National Park to the north-west and south-west, and therefore the


This remote park in the far west is pristine wilderness, which, to the ardent bush-lover, is its biggest attraction, and the rewards are great indeed.

The game is spread out across the plains and takes some driving around to find, but to come upon a vast herd of blue wildebeest, a prowling wild dog, or a pride of dozing lions in this forgotten piece of Africa is especially fitting because of its completely natural and uncommercialized state.

The birdlife is abundant and the very dramatic storms and lightning rising up on the horizon, contrasting with the green and gold grasslands, create spectacular views and fantastic photographic opportunities.

What to do in Liuwa Plains National Park
It is advisable to get a local guide if you are driving





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